It’s the little things

What is Craft? Enjoyment? Mastery? The little things. Slow it down, learn to make something, lose yourself in something, become a master at something. This takes time, appreciation, love.

Somewhere along the way we have lost patience, we have neglected our ability to be awed, we have come to expect instant gratification with little to no effort. This must end. The very ideals of Craft and Art are fading into a snowstorm of electronic/commercial/social static.

Start small:

  • No coffee from pods – brew it, taste it, experiment and learn flavour nuances
  • No insta-poetry / no social media snippets or sound bites – read a book, on paper, from classics to contemporaries
  • No AI – be your own brain. Write, draw, schedule, plan, dream, rebel, expand… on your own terms, through your own volition, with your results and failures in sight
  • No shortcuts / no GPS – take the long road, get tired, get hurt, experience things you never would have expected

This is not a anti-tech or anti-progress manifesto. It is a love-letter to Craft, Enjoyment, Mastery. Only through the little things that we can master we will continue to create lasting magnificence. After the little things have hooked you, the Big Things will beckon, and you will gladly seek them out.

Almost Alien


One of the best aspects of creative writing is the ability to manipulate, transform, mystify. Taking the everyday and making it sublime, ridiculous, awe-inspiring is a skill any writer should hone.

Anyone can describe. It takes a special talent to change what one sees in order to make it interesting, provocative, evocative for a reader. The “stuff” is the same, that original inspiration, but the execution is what counts. Without the ability to engage and entertain, we would all be but scribes, recording the everyday.

When you are writing, exercising the voice and vibe that makes the writing yours, remember that you must run everything through the filter of you. Failure to make the world around you yours, presented in such a way as to bring your world to others, will only result in boring retelling or rewording.

Always ask yourself:

  • Is it presented in a new way?
  • Is it exciting?
  • Will people care?

Always answer:

  • Yes
  • Yes
  • Yes

fishbones

It was cherished

It was cherished
beyond all the other books
dog-eared
stained
its pages read
‘til they fell
from the bindings

she ran inside
the second he’d
cut a sprig
belting out:

it’s like rogue oregano
comes back every year
taking over the damn garden…

she slipped the tome
from the shelf
flipped to great-gran’s recipe
for “fabled” lamb
written in exotic cursive
they didn’t teach anymore
with notes
from aunts and daughters —
her own mother had used a ruler
to underline some ingredients
cross out others – faintly
so the original still showed through —
with suggested substitutions

with a scribe’s reverence
she penciled in
below the loops
and curlicues
to the right of the word
oregano

ROGUE

 

R L Raymond

From Half Myths & Quarter Legends

Traceable Genesis

IMG_3840

…imaging the exhilaration of finding a little piece of the puzzler inside the puzzle…

Wherever your ideas comes from, be it image, fact, lie, it is interesting to have some type of documentation surrounding those ideas. Maybe there is a biographical link, a creative link, an environmental link, a detail that someone, somewhere, sometime will pick up about your piece. Because the original ideas are oftentimes NOT the core of a story or poem, they can add a certain depth for the serious reader. Having the ability to “uncover” these gems can be very rewarding to the parsers. To others, this type of backstory doesn’t matter. That’s great. Writing should be for different audiences. But giving the hardcore fans, the historical sleuths, the biographers of the future something to discover can be satisfying.

Writing can be a jigsaw puzzle. Although the endgame is a complete image/narrative, the process, the construction, the genesis is mostly lost to readers. Just imaging the exhilaration of finding a little piece of the puzzler inside the puzzle — a tidbit, a factoid, a revelation. This can elevate the serious reader to another level.

Biographical content is not necessarily the key. “Write what you know” can be the worst advice a writer could attempt to follow. This said, if there is a cool detail that lead to your piece, a detail that you can jot down somewhere in a journal, kept safe for future discovery, that is a priceless nugget. Even if it is totally unnecessary for the final fiction, that nugget can add so much to someone who had taken the time to discover it.

With practice, and by following your personal voice, style, aesthetic, these nuggets will start to manifest in the overarch of your oeuvre: links, parallels, juxtapositions that alone mean nothing; bits that taken together, maybe with the addition of extra-textual notes, become beacons of meaning.

That’s why it is important to save your notebooks, to have someone who knows about them, someone who will, eventually, help the world decipher the hidden stories within your stories.

fishbones

I, Gabble Retchet

the mongrel paws
shortbread snow
piled at the drive’s end

his bay fades
in a frozen huff
halfway to the door

inside she bakes cookies
humming a lullaby
in which she still believes

again he slinks to his rocky haunt
to wait for spring
the feel of water on his face forgotten

 

R L Raymond

From Half Myths & Quarter Legends

All’s Hollow

IMG_4101
Image © R L Raymond

we ignore the remains
cast off in haste
from bloody limbs
and pointy hats
to styro skulls
and dimestore tiaras

blown by the wind
washed down the driveways
and sidewalks
into the storm-drains
and sewers
where everything floats

it will all freeze through the winter
it will all rot through the spring

 

R L Raymond

Wading in sameness

3a8d6124-b8f7-442a-8fb2-185c85412bb8
Image © R L Raymond

Lately I’ve noticed a surge of statistics and articles on increasing popularity, discoverability, readability. This idea also seems to be trickling down into the creative writing world, especially poetry. It seems that content is being replaced by style, message by findability. Ok, so this isn’t new, but the sheer volume of noise behind the movement is disconcerting.

Every title of every article is the same, and some of these pieces even offer exact formulae for proper title wording. To me, an old school writer, it seems self-defeating. It is the definition of vicious cycle: read articles about how to get articles read. While some of the pieces offer great information and insight, many rehash, refurbish, recycle. Does creativity take a backseat to search optimization?

The same holds true for poetry these days. Themes, styles, looks all drain into one homogeneous slush of ‘poeming.’ It is becoming more and more difficult to tell poets/writers apart — it all sounds the same, about the same thing, written pretty much the same way. Where articles use canned headlines, poems use the same short, choppy prose, losing any differentiating, interesting, identifiable characteristics. The essence of voice (see my short piece on voice) is gone.

  • Commodification kills style
  • Commodification kills voice
  • Commodification kills art

Randomly select an article in a publication, on the web, anywhere, and truly try to find the author in it. Do the same with some contemporary poetry. Can you really, REALLY, identify the poet? It is getting tough. This is not to say there aren’t many great writers, poets, novelists, etc… I just find it disheartening that it takes much more effort to wade through the swamp of sameness to reach a little island of beauty. And, people are often instructed to become more homogenous:

  • How to get reads
  • How to get clicks
  • How to get published

In each case, the message is simple: be more like everyone else, and everyone will read your stuff. Journals often tell writers to read what they like, what they’ve published, what they don’t like. If conformity was the goal, we would not have Samuel Beckett, H.D., or any other writer experimenting, excelling, inspiring. Instead of compelling, complex, cerebral writing, we would only have short, simple sentences and paragraphs of a certain length, apps to make us write like Hemingway (no hate, I LOVE Hemingway, mostly because he was Hemingway), apps to cut words we don’t need, to suggest better, shorter, more common words… oh, wait, nevermind…

“They don’t make movies like they used to.”

“Whatever happened to the classics?

“Now THAT song will never get old!”

When we do find something different, exciting, fresh, a piece, poem, story, novel, song that is identifiable to a particular creator, we instantly know we’ve found something special. It will survive ‘pop’ culture, trends, the ‘must-dos’ of the day. Without differentiation, experimentation, deviation from the blob of sameness, there is nothing special. That’s why, for me, I want quirky titles, non-conforming articles, poems that are still poetry. I think it’s something we should all want, need, demand. My suggestion: make it yours and let the world find you. It doesn’t help to try and make it fit. That just fills the swamp. If it’s good, if it’s yours, if it’s fresh, it will be discovered, remembered, cherished.

Off to a tiny island, to read weird, wild, wacky stuff, I remain — RLR

fishbones

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